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Steps to take when subjected to workplace discrimination

Experiencing unfair and unjust treatment at work can be a stressful experience that could affect a person's life in various ways. Those who are subjected to such treatment may wish to take every possible measure to protect their legal rights, but they might not always be certain how to achieve this goal. Individuals in California who encounter similar challenges could benefit from seeking advice on the next steps to take after being subjected to workplace discrimination.

Discrimination may also cause serious health effects

When women in California face discrimination on the job, the financial impact may be immediately visible. Women may not be hired for jobs, they may face termination more quickly, or they may lose out on promotions for which they were qualified. This can quickly add up to thousands of dollars lost due to gender discrimination. However, there are other serious effects that can accompany workplace discrimination. Many victims' mental and even physical health may suffer, especially if they deal with stress due to retaliation or complaints that are not taken seriously by their employers.

Glassdoor releases data regarding discrimination at work

According to Glassdoor, there has been a 30% increase in job listings related to diversity and inclusion since 2018. However, companies in California and throughout the country still have issues when it comes to treating their workers properly. A Glassdoor survey found that 60% of respondents had either been victims of workplace harassment or saw others victimized on the job. This is in spite of the fact that roughly 75% of companies that took part in the survey said that they had a diverse workforce.

Appeals court finds evidence of wage discrimination

Employers in California can get into legal trouble if they are paying a female employee less than a male employee who performs the same type of work. That's because unequal pay for equal work is considered gender discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Recently, a federal appeals court concluded that there are other paths to sue for pay discrimination besides unequal pay for equal work.

Employees can fight back against workplace discrimination

Employees in California continue to face discrimination on the job, despite laws that prohibit the practice at federal, state and local levels. Employers may not discriminate in hiring, promotion or termination on the basis of protected characteristics, which include race, sex, disability, religion, age and in many cases sexual orientation or gender identity. In addition, sexual harassment is also prohibited in the workplace. At the federal level, affected employees must show that their jobs were directly under threat or that they were subject to severe or pervasive conduct, whether a single extreme incident or an ongoing offensive climate.

Study says workplace discrimination still prevalent

A survey by online company review site Glassdoor indicates that 61% of employees in California and across the country have experienced or witnessed discriminatory behavior in the workplace. The study included more than 1,100 employees and asked about discrimination that was based on gender, race, LGBTQ identification or age. Nationwide, 42% of those who responded said they had witnessed racism at work, and 45% said they'd witnessed discrimination based on age.

Supreme Court to hear age discrimination case

The outcome of a Supreme Court case coming forward this term could have an impact on how federal workers in California fight back against age discrimination. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), passed in 1967, forbade discrimination on the basis of age for workers. However, appeals courts have split over the definition of actionable age discrimination. Some courts argue that workers must only show that age bias was one contributing factor in a negative decision about employment, promotion, termination or another employment-related decision. It does not need to be the only factor or even the primary one.

EEOC sides with workers alleging Facebook job ads discriminate

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has issued a groundbreaking decision concerning complaints of discrimination against employers that used Facebook advertising to discriminate against women and older people. Multiple complaints filed by Facebook users against 66 companies prompted the commission to agree that the demographic targeting system within Facebook advertising tools enabled discrimination against job seekers in California and nationwide.

Age discrimination a problem for older workers

Women in the workplace are far more likely to suffer from sexual harassment, pregnancy discrimination and other types of gender discrimination in California. However, there are also unique concerns that are particularly important for men in the workplace. Age discrimination is one such concern that has a stronger effect on men. According to one 2019 study of age-related discrimination in the workplace, less than 33% of women believed that their age was a factor in holding them back from finding new jobs or obtaining a promotion. On the other hand, almost 40% of male participants did indicate that age was a barrier for them in the workplace.

Large companies back LGBT workers' rights

LGBT workers in California and across the country could be seriously affected by the outcome of three cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. On Oct. 8, the high court is scheduled to hear oral arguments on the cases, which concern whether workplace discrimination against LGBT employees is prohibited under federal civil rights laws. In a striking move from the business community, over 200 large corporations filed a legal brief urging the court to rule that LGBT workers are protected under existing law prohibiting sex discrimination.

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