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Google sued for discrimination against white and Asian men

A former Google employee has filed a lawsuit against the California-based company for discrimination. According to the complaint, YouTube, which is owned by Google, pressured recruiters to exclude white men and Asian men when hiring as a way to increase the company's diversity.

Dealing with gender discrimination in the workplace

Sexual harassment has become a hot-button issue in California after allegations were made against several prominent figures in the entertainment industry, and research shows that this kind of behavior is also worryingly common in workplaces around the world. Four out of five of the 856 male and female managers in United Kingdom comanies polled by the Chartered Management Institute said that they had either been the victim of or witnessed some form of sexual discrimination or harassment while at work.

Companies accused of using social media to skirt labor law

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act prohibits employers in California and the rest of the country from discriminating against job applicants who have reached the age of 40. However, the results of an investigation conducted by ProPublica and the New York Times indicates that some of the nation's largest corporations are using social media to skirt the landmark 1967 law. According to the study, companies including Amazon, Target, Verizon and Goldman Sachs use the demographic filters offered by ad platforms from Facebook and Google to ensure that older job seekers are unable to view their help wanted advertising.

Minorities may still face discrimination by employers

Many California residents believe that hard work and education are the keys to success. While this may be part of the equation, societal tendencies may also play a role in whether an individual has success as a professional. Research has shown that black and Latino individuals have faced bias when it comes to being hired by companies. A study that included researchers from Harvard and Northwestern found that hiring discrimination against black workers hasn't changed in 25 years.

Activists push for Title VII protection of sexual orientation

The lawsuit against the employer of a skydiving instructor should pique the interest of people in California concerned about workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation. According to court filings, the employer stands accused of firing the man because of his sexual orientation. The case has gained national attention now that the Department of Justice has filed an amicus brief insisting that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not protect people from discrimination because of sexual orientation.

Age discrimination in the tech industry

As many California workers are aware, tech startups and other companies within the technology industry are known for their youthful, hip work culture. While this free-spirited energy can make these types of places fun to work for recent college graduates, it creates a serious age discrimination issue as workers who are 55 years old and above tend to get relegated to jobs that are considered to be "old people" work.

Wage discrimination includes more groups than women

A review of filings at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission shows that discriminatory pay practices by employers in California and nationwide do not emerge solely from discrimination against women. Race, age, national origin, disability and religion also inspire many wage discrimination claims.

Workplace discrimination claims under Title VII or Section 1981

A California employee who is filing a workplace racial discrimination lawsuit may do so under a federal statute commonly referred to as Section 1981 or under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It is important to understand the difference between the two. For example, to file a claim under Title VII, it is necessary to first go through the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Once administrative remedies through the EEOC have been exhausted, a lawsuit can be filed. Under Section 1981, it is not necessary to file a claim with the EEOC first.

Quitting a job raises legal bar for winning discrimination claim

California employees who are contemplating leaving their jobs due to harassment or discrimination should understand the different views that courts take of hostile work environments and constructive discharge claims. In general, a hostile work environment arises when an employee in a protected class experiences discrimination or harassment. A constructive discharge describes an employee leaving a job because the unfair treatment has become unbearable. The Supreme Court of the United States defines it as an act that a reasonable person would consider necessary to escape an unendurable situation.

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